Tag Archives: st. louis lettuce contaminated

St. Louis E. Coli Lawyers

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has determined that romaine lettuce from a single farm is likely to blame for an E. coli outbreak in Missouri and nine other states.

All told, 60 people got sick in the outbreak that began in October and ended in November. No one died, but at least 30 were hospitalized and two developed severe kidney disease. Thirty-seven of the illnesses were in Missouri. Illinois had the second-most reported illnesses with nine.

St. Louis-based Schnuck Markets Inc. confirmed that is the chain where some of the lettuce was sold in salad bars. However, the CDC says the lettuce was contaminated prior to distribution to Schnucks. The CDC did not name the supplier.

Read More: http://www.news-leader.com/article/20111208/NEWS11/111208007/lettuce-e-coli-missouri?odyssey=mod|newswell|text|FRONTPAGE|s

 

Missouri E. Coli Lawyers

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has determined that romaine lettuce from a single farm is likely to blame for an E. coli outbreak in Missouri and nine other states.

All told, 60 people got sick in the outbreak that began in October and ended in November. No one died, but at least 30 were hospitalized and two developed severe kidney disease. Thirty-seven of the illnesses were in Missouri. Illinois had the second-most reported illnesses with nine.

St. Louis-based Schnuck Markets Inc. confirmed that is the chain where some of the lettuce was sold in salad bars. However, the CDC says the lettuce was contaminated prior to distribution to Schnucks. The CDC did not name the supplier.

Read More: http://www.news-leader.com/article/20111208/NEWS11/111208007/lettuce-e-coli-missouri?odyssey=mod|newswell|text|FRONTPAGE|s

 

Springfield E. Coli Attorney

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has determined that romaine lettuce from a single farm is likely to blame for an E. coli outbreak in Missouri and nine other states.

All told, 60 people got sick in the outbreak that began in October and ended in November. No one died, but at least 30 were hospitalized and two developed severe kidney disease. Thirty-seven of the illnesses were in Missouri. Illinois had the second-most reported illnesses with nine.

St. Louis-based Schnuck Markets Inc. confirmed that is the chain where some of the lettuce was sold in salad bars. However, the CDC says the lettuce was contaminated prior to distribution to Schnucks. The CDC did not name the supplier.

Read More: http://www.news-leader.com/article/20111208/NEWS11/111208007/lettuce-e-coli-missouri?odyssey=mod|newswell|text|FRONTPAGE|s

 

Romaine lettuce blamed for E. coli outbreak

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has determined that romaine lettuce from a single farm is likely to blame for an E. coli outbreak in Missouri and nine other states.

All told, 60 people got sick in the outbreak that began in October and ended in November. No one died, but at least 30 were hospitalized and two developed severe kidney disease. Thirty-seven of the illnesses were in Missouri. Illinois had the second-most reported illnesses with nine.

St. Louis-based Schnuck Markets Inc. confirmed that is the chain where some of the lettuce was sold in salad bars. However, the CDC says the lettuce was contaminated prior to distribution to Schnucks. The CDC did not name the supplier.

Read More: http://www.news-leader.com/article/20111208/NEWS11/111208007/lettuce-e-coli-missouri?odyssey=mod|newswell|text|FRONTPAGE|s

 

Missouri E. Coli Lawyer

At 60 confirmed cases, and many more ill people whose stool samples, for a variety of reasons, did not test positive for E. coli, the Schnuck’s romaine lettuce E. coli outbreak has caused more illnesses than all but 6 lettuce and leafy greens E. coli outbreaks in the last decade and a half.  In the #1 spot in terms of destruction caused is, of course, the Dole baby spinach E. coli outbreak in 2006, which caused 205 confirmed illnesses, 5 deaths, and more than 30 cases of hemolytic uremic syndrome, or HUS.

Some history, including a summary of FDA’s repeated efforts to stop these outbreaks:

E. coli outbreaks linked to lettuce and other leafy green vegetables have happened again and again, particularly over the past decade and a half. Not all have garnered the media attention that the 2006 spinach outbreak did, and some have even gone unreported publicly. Here is a list of lettuce and other leafy green outbreaks since 1993:

1. August 1993 – E. coli O157:H7 outbreak linked to a salad bar; 53 reported cases in Washington State

2. July 1995 – Lettuce (leafy green; red; romaine) E. coli O157:H7; 70 reported cases in Montana

3. September 1995 – Lettuce (romaine) E. coli O157:H7; 20 reported cases in Idaho

4. September 1995 – Lettuce (iceberg) E. coli O157:H7; 30 reported cases in Maine

5. October 1995 – Lettuce (iceberg; unconfirmed) E. coli O157:H7; 11 reported cases in Ohio

6. May-June 1996 – Lettuce (mesclun; red leaf) E. coli O157:H7; 61 reported cases in Connecticut, Illinois, and New York

7. May 1998 – Salad E. coli O157:H7; two reported cases in California

8. February.-March 1999 – Lettuce (iceberg) E. coli O157:H7; 72 reported cases in Nebraska

9. July-August 2002 – Lettuce (romaine) E. coli O157:H7; 29 reported cases in Washington and Idaho

10. October 2003-May 2004 – Lettuce (mixed salad) E. coli O157:H7; 57 reported cases in California

11. April 2004 – Spinach E. coli O157:H7; 16 reported cases in California

12. September 2005 – Lettuce (romaine) E. coli O157:H7; 32 reported cases in Minnesota, Wisconsin, and Oregon

13. September 2006 – Spinach E. coli O157:H7; 205 case (five deaths) nationwide

14. November 2006 – Lettuce E. coli O157:H7; New York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania; 71 sickened

15. December 2006 – Lettuce E. coli O157:H7; Iowa, Minnesota, Wisconsin; 81 ill

16. May 2008 – Lettuce E. coli O157:H7; Washington; 9 ill

17.  May 2010 – Freshway E. coli O145 outbreak; Michigan, New York, Ohio, Pennsylvania, and Tennessee; 33 ill

Read More: http://www.foodpoisonjournal.com/foodborne-illness-outbreaks/e-coli-outbreaks-caused-by-lettuce-and-other-leafy-greens-where-does-schnucks-romaine-lettuce-rank/

 

Springfield E. Coli Lawyer

At 60 confirmed cases, and many more ill people whose stool samples, for a variety of reasons, did not test positive for E. coli, the Schnuck’s romaine lettuce E. coli outbreak has caused more illnesses than all but 6 lettuce and leafy greens E. coli outbreaks in the last decade and a half.  In the #1 spot in terms of destruction caused is, of course, the Dole baby spinach E. coli outbreak in 2006, which caused 205 confirmed illnesses, 5 deaths, and more than 30 cases of hemolytic uremic syndrome, or HUS.

Some history, including a summary of FDA’s repeated efforts to stop these outbreaks:

E. coli outbreaks linked to lettuce and other leafy green vegetables have happened again and again, particularly over the past decade and a half. Not all have garnered the media attention that the 2006 spinach outbreak did, and some have even gone unreported publicly. Here is a list of lettuce and other leafy green outbreaks since 1993:

1. August 1993 – E. coli O157:H7 outbreak linked to a salad bar; 53 reported cases in Washington State

2. July 1995 – Lettuce (leafy green; red; romaine) E. coli O157:H7; 70 reported cases in Montana

3. September 1995 – Lettuce (romaine) E. coli O157:H7; 20 reported cases in Idaho

4. September 1995 – Lettuce (iceberg) E. coli O157:H7; 30 reported cases in Maine

5. October 1995 – Lettuce (iceberg; unconfirmed) E. coli O157:H7; 11 reported cases in Ohio

6. May-June 1996 – Lettuce (mesclun; red leaf) E. coli O157:H7; 61 reported cases in Connecticut, Illinois, and New York

7. May 1998 – Salad E. coli O157:H7; two reported cases in California

8. February.-March 1999 – Lettuce (iceberg) E. coli O157:H7; 72 reported cases in Nebraska

9. July-August 2002 – Lettuce (romaine) E. coli O157:H7; 29 reported cases in Washington and Idaho

10. October 2003-May 2004 – Lettuce (mixed salad) E. coli O157:H7; 57 reported cases in California

11. April 2004 – Spinach E. coli O157:H7; 16 reported cases in California

12. September 2005 – Lettuce (romaine) E. coli O157:H7; 32 reported cases in Minnesota, Wisconsin, and Oregon

13. September 2006 – Spinach E. coli O157:H7; 205 case (five deaths) nationwide

14. November 2006 – Lettuce E. coli O157:H7; New York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania; 71 sickened

15. December 2006 – Lettuce E. coli O157:H7; Iowa, Minnesota, Wisconsin; 81 ill

16. May 2008 – Lettuce E. coli O157:H7; Washington; 9 ill

17.  May 2010 – Freshway E. coli O145 outbreak; Michigan, New York, Ohio, Pennsylvania, and Tennessee; 33 ill

Read More: http://www.foodpoisonjournal.com/foodborne-illness-outbreaks/e-coli-outbreaks-caused-by-lettuce-and-other-leafy-greens-where-does-schnucks-romaine-lettuce-rank/

 

E. coli outbreaks caused by lettuce and other leafy greens: where does Schnuck’s romaine lettuce rank?

At 60 confirmed cases, and many more ill people whose stool samples, for a variety of reasons, did not test positive for E. coli, the Schnuck’s romaine lettuce E. coli outbreak has caused more illnesses than all but 6 lettuce and leafy greens E. coli outbreaks in the last decade and a half.  In the #1 spot in terms of destruction caused is, of course, the Dole baby spinach E. coli outbreak in 2006, which caused 205 confirmed illnesses, 5 deaths, and more than 30 cases of hemolytic uremic syndrome, or HUS.

Some history, including a summary of FDA’s repeated efforts to stop these outbreaks:

E. coli outbreaks linked to lettuce and other leafy green vegetables have happened again and again, particularly over the past decade and a half. Not all have garnered the media attention that the 2006 spinach outbreak did, and some have even gone unreported publicly. Here is a list of lettuce and other leafy green outbreaks since 1993:

1. August 1993 – E. coli O157:H7 outbreak linked to a salad bar; 53 reported cases in Washington State

2. July 1995 – Lettuce (leafy green; red; romaine) E. coli O157:H7; 70 reported cases in Montana

3. September 1995 – Lettuce (romaine) E. coli O157:H7; 20 reported cases in Idaho

4. September 1995 – Lettuce (iceberg) E. coli O157:H7; 30 reported cases in Maine

5. October 1995 – Lettuce (iceberg; unconfirmed) E. coli O157:H7; 11 reported cases in Ohio

6. May-June 1996 – Lettuce (mesclun; red leaf) E. coli O157:H7; 61 reported cases in Connecticut, Illinois, and New York

7. May 1998 – Salad E. coli O157:H7; two reported cases in California

8. February.-March 1999 – Lettuce (iceberg) E. coli O157:H7; 72 reported cases in Nebraska

9. July-August 2002 – Lettuce (romaine) E. coli O157:H7; 29 reported cases in Washington and Idaho

10. October 2003-May 2004 – Lettuce (mixed salad) E. coli O157:H7; 57 reported cases in California

11. April 2004 – Spinach E. coli O157:H7; 16 reported cases in California

12. September 2005 – Lettuce (romaine) E. coli O157:H7; 32 reported cases in Minnesota, Wisconsin, and Oregon

13. September 2006 – Spinach E. coli O157:H7; 205 case (five deaths) nationwide

14. November 2006 – Lettuce E. coli O157:H7; New York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania; 71 sickened

15. December 2006 – Lettuce E. coli O157:H7; Iowa, Minnesota, Wisconsin; 81 ill

16. May 2008 – Lettuce E. coli O157:H7; Washington; 9 ill

17.  May 2010 – Freshway E. coli O145 outbreak; Michigan, New York, Ohio, Pennsylvania, and Tennessee; 33 ill

Read More: http://www.foodpoisonjournal.com/foodborne-illness-outbreaks/e-coli-outbreaks-caused-by-lettuce-and-other-leafy-greens-where-does-schnucks-romaine-lettuce-rank/

 

What can I do to prevent getting E. coli?

What is E. coli?

E. coli is a  common kind of bacteria that lives in the intestines of animals and people.  There are many strains of E. coli. Most  are harmless.  However, one dangerous  strain is called E. coli O157:H7.  It produces a powerful poison. You can become  very sick if it gets into your food or water.

In 1999 it was estimated that about 73,000 people in the U.S.  got sick each year from E. coli. About  60 died.  It’s believed that the number  of illnesses and deaths has been dropping since then.

How is E.  coli O157:H7 spread?

Outbreaks often are caused by food that has gotten the bacteria, E coli, in it. Bacteria can get accidentally  mixed into ground beef before packaging. Eating undercooked meat can spread the  bacteria, even though the meat looks and smells normal. E. coli can also live on cows’ udders. It may get into milk that is  not pasteurized.

Raw vegetables, sprouts, and fruits that have been grown or  washed in dirty water can carry E. coli O157:H7.  It can get into drinking water, lakes, or swimming pools that have sewage in them.  It is also spread by people who have not washed their hands after going to the  toilet.

E. coli can be spread to playmates  by toddlers who are not toilet trained or by adults who do not wash their hands  carefully after changing diapers. Children can pass the bacteria in their stool to  another person for 2 weeks after they have gotten well from an E. coli O157:H7 illness. Older children and adults rarely carry the bacteria without symptoms.

What are the signs of E.  coli O157:H7 sickness?

Bloody diarrhea and stomach pain are the most common  signs of E. coli O157:H7 sickness.  People usually do not have a fever, or may have only a slight fever.

Some people, especially children under 5 and the elderly,  can become very sick from E. coli O157:H7. The infection damages their red blood cells and their kidneys. This  only happens to about 1 out of 50 people, but it is very serious. Without  hospital care, they can die. See a doctor right away if you think you may have  gotten sick from E. coli O157:H7.

How will my doctor know if E. coli O157:H7 made me sick?

Your doctor will test to see if your sickness was caused by E. coli by sending a stool sample to a lab. The lab will test for the bacteria.

Anyone  who suddenly has diarrhea with blood in it should call or see a doctor.

How is it treated?

Your doctor will tell you what is best.   Taking medicine on your own may not help you get better, and it could  make things worse. Do not take antibiotics or diarrhea medicine like Imodium®  unless your doctor tells you to.

Will E. coli O157:H7 infection cause  problems for me later?

People  who have only diarrhea and stomach ache usually get completely well in 5-10  days. They do not have problems later.

For  those people who get very sick and have kidney failure, about 1 out of 3 may  have kidney problems later. In rare cases, people have other problems like high  blood pressure, blindness, or are paralyzed. Talk to your doctor if you have  questions about this.

What is the U.S. government doing to keep food safe from E. coli O157:H7?

New laws have helped keep food  from being contaminated with E. coli O157:H7. They keep meat safer  during slaughter and grinding, and vegetables safer  when they are grown, picked, and washed. But there is still a chance that E. coli O157:H7 could reach your food,  so you should take the precautions listed below.

What can I do to stay safe from E. coli O157:H7?

  • During an outbreak:  Carefully follow instructions provided by public health officials on  what foods to avoid in order to protect yourself and your family from  infection.
  • Cook all ground beef thoroughly. During an  outbreak of E. coli O157:H7, vegetables should be boiled  for at least 1 minute before serving.
  • Cook ground beef to 160° F Test the meat by putting a  food thermometer in the thickest part of the meat. Do not eat  ground beef that is still pink in the middle.
  • If a restaurant serves you an under-cooked hamburger,  send it back for more cooking. Ask for a new bun and a clean  plate, too.
  • Don’t spread bacteria in your kitchen. Keep raw meat away from other foods. Wash your hands,  cutting board, counter, dishes, and knives and forks with hot soapy water after  they touch raw meat, spinach, greens, or sprouts.
  • Never put cooked hamburgers or meat  on the plate they were on before cooking. Wash the meat  thermometer after use.
  • Drink only pasteurized  milk, juice, or cider. Frozen juice or juice sold  in boxes and glass jars at room temperature  has been pasteurized, although it may not say so on the label.
  • Drink water from safe sources like municipal water that has been treated with  chlorine, wells that have been tested or bottled water.
  • Do not swallow lake or pool water while you are  swimming.

Read More: http://www.cdc.gov/ecoli/qa_ecoli_sickness.htm

 

Signs of E. Coli

What is E. coli?

E. coli is a  common kind of bacteria that lives in the intestines of animals and people.  There are many strains of E. coli. Most  are harmless.  However, one dangerous  strain is called E. coli O157:H7.  It produces a powerful poison. You can become  very sick if it gets into your food or water.

In 1999 it was estimated that about 73,000 people in the U.S.  got sick each year from E. coli. About  60 died.  It’s believed that the number  of illnesses and deaths has been dropping since then.

How is E.  coli O157:H7 spread?

Outbreaks often are caused by food that has gotten the bacteria, E coli, in it. Bacteria can get accidentally  mixed into ground beef before packaging. Eating undercooked meat can spread the  bacteria, even though the meat looks and smells normal. E. coli can also live on cows’ udders. It may get into milk that is  not pasteurized.

Raw vegetables, sprouts, and fruits that have been grown or  washed in dirty water can carry E. coli O157:H7.  It can get into drinking water, lakes, or swimming pools that have sewage in them.  It is also spread by people who have not washed their hands after going to the  toilet.

E. coli can be spread to playmates  by toddlers who are not toilet trained or by adults who do not wash their hands  carefully after changing diapers. Children can pass the bacteria in their stool to  another person for 2 weeks after they have gotten well from an E. coli O157:H7 illness. Older children and adults rarely carry the bacteria without symptoms.

What are the signs of E.  coli O157:H7 sickness?

Bloody diarrhea and stomach pain are the most common  signs of E. coli O157:H7 sickness.  People usually do not have a fever, or may have only a slight fever.

Some people, especially children under 5 and the elderly,  can become very sick from E. coli O157:H7. The infection damages their red blood cells and their kidneys. This  only happens to about 1 out of 50 people, but it is very serious. Without  hospital care, they can die. See a doctor right away if you think you may have  gotten sick from E. coli O157:H7.

How will my doctor know if E. coli O157:H7 made me sick?

Your doctor will test to see if your sickness was caused by E. coli by sending a stool sample to a lab. The lab will test for the bacteria.

Anyone  who suddenly has diarrhea with blood in it should call or see a doctor.

How is it treated?

Your doctor will tell you what is best.   Taking medicine on your own may not help you get better, and it could  make things worse. Do not take antibiotics or diarrhea medicine like Imodium®  unless your doctor tells you to.

Will E. coli O157:H7 infection cause  problems for me later?

People  who have only diarrhea and stomach ache usually get completely well in 5-10  days. They do not have problems later.

For  those people who get very sick and have kidney failure, about 1 out of 3 may  have kidney problems later. In rare cases, people have other problems like high  blood pressure, blindness, or are paralyzed. Talk to your doctor if you have  questions about this.

What is the U.S. government doing to keep food safe from E. coli O157:H7?

New laws have helped keep food  from being contaminated with E. coli O157:H7. They keep meat safer  during slaughter and grinding, and vegetables safer  when they are grown, picked, and washed. But there is still a chance that E. coli O157:H7 could reach your food,  so you should take the precautions listed below.

What can I do to stay safe from E. coli O157:H7?

  • During an outbreak:  Carefully follow instructions provided by public health officials on  what foods to avoid in order to protect yourself and your family from  infection.
  • Cook all ground beef thoroughly. During an  outbreak of E. coli O157:H7, vegetables should be boiled  for at least 1 minute before serving.
  • Cook ground beef to 160° F Test the meat by putting a  food thermometer in the thickest part of the meat. Do not eat  ground beef that is still pink in the middle.
  • If a restaurant serves you an under-cooked hamburger,  send it back for more cooking. Ask for a new bun and a clean  plate, too.
  • Don’t spread bacteria in your kitchen. Keep raw meat away from other foods. Wash your hands,  cutting board, counter, dishes, and knives and forks with hot soapy water after  they touch raw meat, spinach, greens, or sprouts.
  • Never put cooked hamburgers or meat  on the plate they were on before cooking. Wash the meat  thermometer after use.
  • Drink only pasteurized  milk, juice, or cider. Frozen juice or juice sold  in boxes and glass jars at room temperature  has been pasteurized, although it may not say so on the label.
  • Drink water from safe sources like municipal water that has been treated with  chlorine, wells that have been tested or bottled water.
  • Do not swallow lake or pool water while you are  swimming.

Read More: http://www.cdc.gov/ecoli/qa_ecoli_sickness.htm

 

What is E. Coli?

What is E. coli?

E. coli is a  common kind of bacteria that lives in the intestines of animals and people.  There are many strains of E. coli. Most  are harmless.  However, one dangerous  strain is called E. coli O157:H7.  It produces a powerful poison. You can become  very sick if it gets into your food or water.

In 1999 it was estimated that about 73,000 people in the U.S.  got sick each year from E. coli. About  60 died.  It’s believed that the number  of illnesses and deaths has been dropping since then.

How is E.  coli O157:H7 spread?

Outbreaks often are caused by food that has gotten the bacteria, E coli, in it. Bacteria can get accidentally  mixed into ground beef before packaging. Eating undercooked meat can spread the  bacteria, even though the meat looks and smells normal. E. coli can also live on cows’ udders. It may get into milk that is  not pasteurized.

Raw vegetables, sprouts, and fruits that have been grown or  washed in dirty water can carry E. coli O157:H7.  It can get into drinking water, lakes, or swimming pools that have sewage in them.  It is also spread by people who have not washed their hands after going to the  toilet.

E. coli can be spread to playmates  by toddlers who are not toilet trained or by adults who do not wash their hands  carefully after changing diapers. Children can pass the bacteria in their stool to  another person for 2 weeks after they have gotten well from an E. coli O157:H7 illness. Older children and adults rarely carry the bacteria without symptoms.

What are the signs of E.  coli O157:H7 sickness?

Bloody diarrhea and stomach pain are the most common  signs of E. coli O157:H7 sickness.  People usually do not have a fever, or may have only a slight fever.

Some people, especially children under 5 and the elderly,  can become very sick from E. coli O157:H7. The infection damages their red blood cells and their kidneys. This  only happens to about 1 out of 50 people, but it is very serious. Without  hospital care, they can die. See a doctor right away if you think you may have  gotten sick from E. coli O157:H7.

How will my doctor know if E. coli O157:H7 made me sick?

Your doctor will test to see if your sickness was caused by E. coli by sending a stool sample to a lab. The lab will test for the bacteria.

Anyone  who suddenly has diarrhea with blood in it should call or see a doctor.

How is it treated?

Your doctor will tell you what is best.   Taking medicine on your own may not help you get better, and it could  make things worse. Do not take antibiotics or diarrhea medicine like Imodium®  unless your doctor tells you to.

Will E. coli O157:H7 infection cause  problems for me later?

People  who have only diarrhea and stomach ache usually get completely well in 5-10  days. They do not have problems later.

For  those people who get very sick and have kidney failure, about 1 out of 3 may  have kidney problems later. In rare cases, people have other problems like high  blood pressure, blindness, or are paralyzed. Talk to your doctor if you have  questions about this.

What is the U.S. government doing to keep food safe from E. coli O157:H7?

New laws have helped keep food  from being contaminated with E. coli O157:H7. They keep meat safer  during slaughter and grinding, and vegetables safer  when they are grown, picked, and washed. But there is still a chance that E. coli O157:H7 could reach your food,  so you should take the precautions listed below.

What can I do to stay safe from E. coli O157:H7?

  • During an outbreak:  Carefully follow instructions provided by public health officials on  what foods to avoid in order to protect yourself and your family from  infection.
  • Cook all ground beef thoroughly. During an  outbreak of E. coli O157:H7, vegetables should be boiled  for at least 1 minute before serving.
  • Cook ground beef to 160° F Test the meat by putting a  food thermometer in the thickest part of the meat. Do not eat  ground beef that is still pink in the middle.
  • If a restaurant serves you an under-cooked hamburger,  send it back for more cooking. Ask for a new bun and a clean  plate, too.
  • Don’t spread bacteria in your kitchen. Keep raw meat away from other foods. Wash your hands,  cutting board, counter, dishes, and knives and forks with hot soapy water after  they touch raw meat, spinach, greens, or sprouts.
  • Never put cooked hamburgers or meat  on the plate they were on before cooking. Wash the meat  thermometer after use.
  • Drink only pasteurized  milk, juice, or cider. Frozen juice or juice sold  in boxes and glass jars at room temperature  has been pasteurized, although it may not say so on the label.
  • Drink water from safe sources like municipal water that has been treated with  chlorine, wells that have been tested or bottled water.
  • Do not swallow lake or pool water while you are  swimming.

Read More: http://www.cdc.gov/ecoli/qa_ecoli_sickness.htm

 

Everything You Need To Know About E. Coli

What is E. coli?

E. coli is a  common kind of bacteria that lives in the intestines of animals and people.  There are many strains of E. coli. Most  are harmless.  However, one dangerous  strain is called E. coli O157:H7.  It produces a powerful poison. You can become  very sick if it gets into your food or water.

In 1999 it was estimated that about 73,000 people in the U.S.  got sick each year from E. coli. About  60 died.  It’s believed that the number  of illnesses and deaths has been dropping since then.

How is E.  coli O157:H7 spread?

Outbreaks often are caused by food that has gotten the bacteria, E coli, in it. Bacteria can get accidentally  mixed into ground beef before packaging. Eating undercooked meat can spread the  bacteria, even though the meat looks and smells normal. E. coli can also live on cows’ udders. It may get into milk that is  not pasteurized.

Raw vegetables, sprouts, and fruits that have been grown or  washed in dirty water can carry E. coli O157:H7.  It can get into drinking water, lakes, or swimming pools that have sewage in them.  It is also spread by people who have not washed their hands after going to the  toilet.

E. coli can be spread to playmates  by toddlers who are not toilet trained or by adults who do not wash their hands  carefully after changing diapers. Children can pass the bacteria in their stool to  another person for 2 weeks after they have gotten well from an E. coli O157:H7 illness. Older children and adults rarely carry the bacteria without symptoms.

What are the signs of E.  coli O157:H7 sickness?

Bloody diarrhea and stomach pain are the most common  signs of E. coli O157:H7 sickness.  People usually do not have a fever, or may have only a slight fever.

Some people, especially children under 5 and the elderly,  can become very sick from E. coli O157:H7. The infection damages their red blood cells and their kidneys. This  only happens to about 1 out of 50 people, but it is very serious. Without  hospital care, they can die. See a doctor right away if you think you may have  gotten sick from E. coli O157:H7.

How will my doctor know if E. coli O157:H7 made me sick?

Your doctor will test to see if your sickness was caused by E. coli by sending a stool sample to a lab. The lab will test for the bacteria.

Anyone  who suddenly has diarrhea with blood in it should call or see a doctor.

How is it treated?

Your doctor will tell you what is best.   Taking medicine on your own may not help you get better, and it could  make things worse. Do not take antibiotics or diarrhea medicine like Imodium®  unless your doctor tells you to.

Will E. coli O157:H7 infection cause  problems for me later?

People  who have only diarrhea and stomach ache usually get completely well in 5-10  days. They do not have problems later.

For  those people who get very sick and have kidney failure, about 1 out of 3 may  have kidney problems later. In rare cases, people have other problems like high  blood pressure, blindness, or are paralyzed. Talk to your doctor if you have  questions about this.

What is the U.S. government doing to keep food safe from E. coli O157:H7?

New laws have helped keep food  from being contaminated with E. coli O157:H7. They keep meat safer  during slaughter and grinding, and vegetables safer  when they are grown, picked, and washed. But there is still a chance that E. coli O157:H7 could reach your food,  so you should take the precautions listed below.

What can I do to stay safe from E. coli O157:H7?

  • During an outbreak:  Carefully follow instructions provided by public health officials on  what foods to avoid in order to protect yourself and your family from  infection.
  • Cook all ground beef thoroughly. During an  outbreak of E. coli O157:H7, vegetables should be boiled  for at least 1 minute before serving.
  • Cook ground beef to 160° F Test the meat by putting a  food thermometer in the thickest part of the meat. Do not eat  ground beef that is still pink in the middle.
  • If a restaurant serves you an under-cooked hamburger,  send it back for more cooking. Ask for a new bun and a clean  plate, too.
  • Don’t spread bacteria in your kitchen. Keep raw meat away from other foods. Wash your hands,  cutting board, counter, dishes, and knives and forks with hot soapy water after  they touch raw meat, spinach, greens, or sprouts.
  • Never put cooked hamburgers or meat  on the plate they were on before cooking. Wash the meat  thermometer after use.
  • Drink only pasteurized  milk, juice, or cider. Frozen juice or juice sold  in boxes and glass jars at room temperature  has been pasteurized, although it may not say so on the label.
  • Drink water from safe sources like municipal water that has been treated with  chlorine, wells that have been tested or bottled water.
  • Do not swallow lake or pool water while you are  swimming.

Read More: http://www.cdc.gov/ecoli/qa_ecoli_sickness.htm

 

Missouri E. Coli Lawyer

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has determined that romaine lettuce from a single farm is likely to blame for an E. coli outbreak in Missouri and nine other states.

All told, 60 people got sick in the outbreak that began in October and ended in November. No one died, but at least 30 were hospitalized and two developed severe kidney disease. Thirty-seven of the illnesses were in Missouri. Illinois had the second-most reported illnesses with nine.

St. Louis-based Schnuck Markets Inc. confirmed that is the chain where some of the lettuce was sold in salad bars. However, the CDC says the lettuce was contaminated prior to distribution to Schnucks. The CDC did not name the supplier.

Read More: http://www.news-leader.com/article/20111208/NEWS11/111208007/lettuce-e-coli-missouri?odyssey=mod|newswell|text|FRONTPAGE|s

 

Springfield E. Coli Lawyer

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has determined that romaine lettuce from a single farm is likely to blame for an E. coli outbreak in Missouri and nine other states.

All told, 60 people got sick in the outbreak that began in October and ended in November. No one died, but at least 30 were hospitalized and two developed severe kidney disease. Thirty-seven of the illnesses were in Missouri. Illinois had the second-most reported illnesses with nine.

St. Louis-based Schnuck Markets Inc. confirmed that is the chain where some of the lettuce was sold in salad bars. However, the CDC says the lettuce was contaminated prior to distribution to Schnucks. The CDC did not name the supplier.

Read More: http://www.news-leader.com/article/20111208/NEWS11/111208007/lettuce-e-coli-missouri?odyssey=mod|newswell|text|FRONTPAGE|s

 

Romaine lettuce blamed for E. coli outbreak

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has determined that romaine lettuce from a single farm is likely to blame for an E. coli outbreak in Missouri and nine other states.

All told, 60 people got sick in the outbreak that began in October and ended in November. No one died, but at least 30 were hospitalized and two developed severe kidney disease. Thirty-seven of the illnesses were in Missouri. Illinois had the second-most reported illnesses with nine.

St. Louis-based Schnuck Markets Inc. confirmed that is the chain where some of the lettuce was sold in salad bars. However, the CDC says the lettuce was contaminated prior to distribution to Schnucks. The CDC did not name the supplier.

Read More: http://www.news-leader.com/article/20111208/NEWS11/111208007/lettuce-e-coli-missouri?odyssey=mod|newswell|text|FRONTPAGE|s

 

Missouri E. Coli Lawyers

A nearly two-month investigation ended Wednesday with the release of a Centers
of Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) report linking romaine lettuce to an E.
coli O157:H7 outbreak that has sickened at least 60 people in 10 states. The
romaine lettuce was served in salad bars at multiple Schnucks supermarket
locations and originated at a single farm and distributor — neither of which
has yet to be named.

“The practice of holding back names of distributors and producers is not
altogether uncommon, but nonetheless troubling,” said food safety expert and E.
coli attorney, Bill Marler. “Schnucks ought to do two things: release the names
of both the farm and distributor and make sure the medical bills of their
customers are covered,” said Marler.

Since 2000 there have been over 80 foodborne illness outbreaks linked to
lettuce and, since 1993 lettuce has been responsible for more than two-dozen E.
coli outbreaks. Many of those outbreaks affected multiple states, as is
presently the case with victims identified in the following 10 states: Arizona
(1), Arkansas (2), Georgia (1), Illinois (9), Indiana (2), Kansas (3), Kentucky
(1), Minnesota (3), Missouri (37), and Nebraska (1). In addition to Schnucks,
illnesses have been linked to universities in both Missouri and Minnesota.

Read More: http://www.marketwatch.com/story/attorney-william-marler-calls-on-schnucks-to-reveal-romaine-lettuce-producer-and-distributor-urges-grocer-to-pay-victims-medical-costs-2011-12-07

 

Springfield E. Coli Lawyers

A nearly two-month investigation ended Wednesday with the release of a Centers
of Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) report linking romaine lettuce to an E.
coli O157:H7 outbreak that has sickened at least 60 people in 10 states. The
romaine lettuce was served in salad bars at multiple Schnucks supermarket
locations and originated at a single farm and distributor — neither of which
has yet to be named.

“The practice of holding back names of distributors and producers is not
altogether uncommon, but nonetheless troubling,” said food safety expert and E.
coli attorney, Bill Marler. “Schnucks ought to do two things: release the names
of both the farm and distributor and make sure the medical bills of their
customers are covered,” said Marler.

Since 2000 there have been over 80 foodborne illness outbreaks linked to
lettuce and, since 1993 lettuce has been responsible for more than two-dozen E.
coli outbreaks. Many of those outbreaks affected multiple states, as is
presently the case with victims identified in the following 10 states: Arizona
(1), Arkansas (2), Georgia (1), Illinois (9), Indiana (2), Kansas (3), Kentucky
(1), Minnesota (3), Missouri (37), and Nebraska (1). In addition to Schnucks,
illnesses have been linked to universities in both Missouri and Minnesota.

Read More: http://www.marketwatch.com/story/attorney-william-marler-calls-on-schnucks-to-reveal-romaine-lettuce-producer-and-distributor-urges-grocer-to-pay-victims-medical-costs-2011-12-07

 

Attorney Calls on Schnucks to Reveal Romaine Lettuce Producer and Distributor, Urges Grocer to Pay Victims’ Medical Costs

A nearly two-month investigation ended Wednesday with the release of a Centers
of Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) report linking romaine lettuce to an E.
coli O157:H7 outbreak that has sickened at least 60 people in 10 states. The
romaine lettuce was served in salad bars at multiple Schnucks supermarket
locations and originated at a single farm and distributor — neither of which
has yet to be named.

“The practice of holding back names of distributors and producers is not
altogether uncommon, but nonetheless troubling,” said food safety expert and E.
coli attorney, Bill Marler. “Schnucks ought to do two things: release the names
of both the farm and distributor and make sure the medical bills of their
customers are covered,” said Marler.

Since 2000 there have been over 80 foodborne illness outbreaks linked to
lettuce and, since 1993 lettuce has been responsible for more than two-dozen E.
coli outbreaks. Many of those outbreaks affected multiple states, as is
presently the case with victims identified in the following 10 states: Arizona
(1), Arkansas (2), Georgia (1), Illinois (9), Indiana (2), Kansas (3), Kentucky
(1), Minnesota (3), Missouri (37), and Nebraska (1). In addition to Schnucks,
illnesses have been linked to universities in both Missouri and Minnesota.

Read More: http://www.marketwatch.com/story/attorney-william-marler-calls-on-schnucks-to-reveal-romaine-lettuce-producer-and-distributor-urges-grocer-to-pay-victims-medical-costs-2011-12-07

 

Missouri E. Coli Lawyer

The CDC is investigating an E. coli outbreak that has sickened dozens of people in 10 states – and all signs point to romaine lettuce as the likely culprit.

The outbreak appeared to have ended last month, but not before 60 people were stricken by E. coli. Half were hospitalized. Two victims suffered kidney failure.

No product names were revealed and there’s no practical advice for consumers.

The CDC reported that many of the ill ate from a salad bar at an unidentified grocery store chain that sourced its lettuce “from a single lettuce processing facility via a single distributor.”

“This indicates that contamination of romaine lettuce likely occurred before the product reached grocery store Chain A locations,” the investigation announcement said.

Illnesses also were reported by people who ate salad at university campuses in Minnesota and Missouri.

Ilnesses were reported in the following states: Arizona (1), Arkansas (2), Georgia (1), Illinois (9), Indiana (2), Kansas (3), Kentucky (1), Minnesota (3), Missouri (37), and Nebraska (1).

The FDA last month announced the recall of bagged romaine lettuce because of possible E. coli contamination. It was unclear whether that recall bears any relation to today’s CDC announcement.

Read More: http://abcnews.go.com/blogs/health/2011/12/07/cdc-investigates-e-coli-in-romaine-lettuce/

 

Springfield E. Coli Lawyer

The CDC is investigating an E. coli outbreak that has sickened dozens of people in 10 states – and all signs point to romaine lettuce as the likely culprit.

The outbreak appeared to have ended last month, but not before 60 people were stricken by E. coli. Half were hospitalized. Two victims suffered kidney failure.

No product names were revealed and there’s no practical advice for consumers.

The CDC reported that many of the ill ate from a salad bar at an unidentified grocery store chain that sourced its lettuce “from a single lettuce processing facility via a single distributor.”

“This indicates that contamination of romaine lettuce likely occurred before the product reached grocery store Chain A locations,” the investigation announcement said.

Illnesses also were reported by people who ate salad at university campuses in Minnesota and Missouri.

Ilnesses were reported in the following states: Arizona (1), Arkansas (2), Georgia (1), Illinois (9), Indiana (2), Kansas (3), Kentucky (1), Minnesota (3), Missouri (37), and Nebraska (1).

The FDA last month announced the recall of bagged romaine lettuce because of possible E. coli contamination. It was unclear whether that recall bears any relation to today’s CDC announcement.

Read More: http://abcnews.go.com/blogs/health/2011/12/07/cdc-investigates-e-coli-in-romaine-lettuce/

 

CDC Investigates E. Coli in Romaine Lettuce

The CDC is investigating an E. coli outbreak that has sickened dozens of people in 10 states – and all signs point to romaine lettuce as the likely culprit.

The outbreak appeared to have ended last month, but not before 60 people were stricken by E. coli. Half were hospitalized. Two victims suffered kidney failure.

No product names were revealed and there’s no practical advice for consumers.

The CDC reported that many of the ill ate from a salad bar at an unidentified grocery store chain that sourced its lettuce “from a single lettuce processing facility via a single distributor.”

“This indicates that contamination of romaine lettuce likely occurred before the product reached grocery store Chain A locations,” the investigation announcement said.

Illnesses also were reported by people who ate salad at university campuses in Minnesota and Missouri.

Ilnesses were reported in the following states: Arizona (1), Arkansas (2), Georgia (1), Illinois (9), Indiana (2), Kansas (3), Kentucky (1), Minnesota (3), Missouri (37), and Nebraska (1).

The FDA last month announced the recall of bagged romaine lettuce because of possible E. coli contamination. It was unclear whether that recall bears any relation to today’s CDC announcement.

Read More: http://abcnews.go.com/blogs/health/2011/12/07/cdc-investigates-e-coli-in-romaine-lettuce/

 

Missouri E. Coli Lawyer

Last month’s outbreak of E. coli has been traced back to lettuce sold at Schnucks stores. The Centers for Disease Control released its final report Wednesday. It found the romaine lettuce came from the same supplier, and was sold at what the CDC called “Grocery Chain A.” However, Schnucks later confirmed it is the chain identified as the source. Health officials also say the outbreak appears to be over.
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Springfield E. Coli Lawyer

Last month’s outbreak of E. coli has been traced back to lettuce sold at Schnucks stores. The Centers for Disease Control released its final report Wednesday. It found the romaine lettuce came from the same supplier, and was sold at what the CDC called “Grocery Chain A.” However, Schnucks later confirmed it is the chain identified as the source. Health officials also say the outbreak appears to be over.
#

E. coli Source Traced to Schnucks

Last month’s outbreak of E. coli has been traced back to lettuce sold at Schnucks stores.
The Centers for Disease Control released its final report Wednesday.
It found the romaine lettuce came from the same supplier, and was sold at what the CDC called “Grocery Chain A.”
However, Schnucks later confirmed it is the chain identified as the source. Health officials also say the outbreak appears to be over.